Community life, cooperative ownership, Events @ Listening Tree, homesteading, organic farm, permaculture, transition

Last potluck of the year *and* National Solar Tour

The last of our open-house potlucks for 2019 is Oct. 5, 4-8 pm. Please come if you are interested in living and/or farming here, or just to connect, stay in touch, enjoy the farms and home, and hear more about what we are doing. Please call (401)710-9784 to RSVP.

During that weekend, homes and other solar installations around the country will open their doors for people to see, get inspired, and learn more about what it takes, what it looks like, and just what it’s like to live solar. So we’ve added this open house to the National Solar Tour, so there will be more emphasis on the solar, energy efficiency & conservation, and carbon farming aspects of life at Listening Tree.

If you are interested in Listening Tree Co-op owner-membership,  but the Oct. 5 date doesn’t work for you, please call to arrange a tour at another time.

Events @ Listening Tree, organic farm

A Whirlwind Tour of Compost: from vermicompost to humanure

July 6, 2-4
with Conor Lally
inside vermiculture shed
Inside the worm composting operation at Listening Tree

Take a whirlwind tour of compost – including various backyard methods, worm composting at the home and farm scale, composting humanure and the many options for eco-toilets and urine diversion. We will discuss the basic science of composting, various technologies and methods, and how to select a system that best meets your needs and preferences. We’ll cover some key points on how to get started and how to approach misinformation and misconceptions that persist. We’ll take a look back at the history of synthetic fertilizer, waterborne sanitation, and industrial farming to better understand how we arrived at our current state, and how we can shift towards a better system that eliminates pollution, protects water, and builds healthy soils. 

Conor Lally of Nutrient Networks will introduce principles and practices, with an insiders view of all three types of composting in action at Listening Tree Co-op.

$20

Register here.

local food & food justice, organic farm, permaculture, species

Last chance for bees

“Due to the use of pesticides — along with climate change, loss of flower meadows, and parasites — bee populations are in decline. Three quarters of all crops around the world rely on animal pollination. But due to pollinator loss, between $235 billion and $577 billion in crop value is at risk,” ThinkProgress summarizes part of the UN extinction report released this week. But it’s not about the money so much as it is about food security. Which the report does mention:  ecological collapse threatens horror upon horror.

This is the last chance to save 500,000 of the one million species that don’t have a fracking home on the earth, or to go back to the technical language, have insufficient habitat to survive as a species.

Coincidentally, or not, it’s also the last chance to sign up for our bee habitat workshop next Saturday, May 18. You can learn right now how to make life easier for pollinators. No one will be turned away for lack of funds. Get those rush tix! Coexist!

 

 

organic farm

Farmland Available: Listening Tree Cooperative

cropped-raised-beds-of-hocus-pocus.jpg

[May 1, 2019 update]

Want to live on your farm? Want to afford to own your farm? Want to start small with room to grow? We still have some land available for farming in the 2019 season–in the no- or low-till section, where the raised beds were worked for three years by Hocus Pocus Farm, and are now in cover crop.

Ultimately, we hope people farming here would live in our group household and be part of the community. But other options are available. Farmers could:

  • lease some of the land still available (2 acres or less),
  • lease to own (as described below),
  • live here or commute,
  • grow annual vegetables or herbs, raise animals, or develop a food forest/perennial crops.

Continue reading “Farmland Available: Listening Tree Cooperative”

organic farm

Raised bed growing workshop

Join us as we learn how to develop raised field beds. At Hocus Pocus Farm, raised field beds were developed for preventing water runoff and disease transmission. Learn how to develop a raised bed by adding amendments, nutrients and compost and learn how to turn over the beds once a crop is ready to be harvested for the season. Soil health and fertility will also be discussed.

Hocus Pocus is a small, chemical free farm located in Chepachet that is run by Courtney Sartini and Sophie Soloway. Hocus Pocus runs a local farm CSA and also sells their crops, seedlings and flowers directly to nearby restaurants and retail establishments. Both Courtney and Sophie bring a dedication of food access and sovereignty to the farm and are committed to providing the local community with a wide variety of high quality vegetables, flowers, culinary herbs, and seedlings.

This is a free event. Registration is encouraged but not required. Last minute attendees are welcome! Check nofari.org for any updates. Photographs may be taken at this event for NOFA RI promotional material. This event is sponsored by RI DEM via a USDA Specialty Crop Block Grant and co-sponsored by Listening Tree Co-op as the host of Hocus Pocus while they’ve been starting up their farm.

 

Events @ Listening Tree, organic farm, transition

Composting with worms for soil healing

A new event @ Listening Tree, Saturday, March 3, 2018 at 11 AM – 1 PM

Bow shed in the snow One of our founding associate members, Ben Goldberg built a bow shed on site for a farm-scale vermiculture project. Our soil was laced with Round-Up for decades before we bought the property, and in places it was as dead as a rock, only hosting lichens and mosses and early successional plants. The soil needs the amazing microbiological boost only worm castings can bring. So with Conor Lally, Ben launched our first social enterprise beyond the farms. The bow shed is a passive solar, wind-compatible design with plenty of room for commercial-scale worm bins. Now’s your chance to learn from Ben about his squirmy permie wormies.

Composting with worms is practical, easy, educational, and fun. Red wiggler worms efficiently convert food scraps into a dynamic soil amendment, a nutrient- and organism-rich compost. On top of that, worm ecosystems provide a remarkable glimpse into the natural world.

This workshop will cover various worm bin designs, worm ecology, care and feeding, and separating the castings for use. This will be an interactive workshop, to be held on site at Listening Tree’s vermiculture operation.

inside vermiculture shed

The presenter:

Ben Goldberg has been keeping worms and making worm bins since 1995. He has presented workshops on worm bin ecology and composting for schools, agricultural conferences, and community groups. Ben holds degrees in both Environmental Education and Ecology from College of the Atlantic and The Audubon Expedition Institute.

Ben will teach us and entertain us all at the same time! You will certainly leave with hands-on knowledge of worm farming, as well as a new appreciation for the little things in life.

Donation: $10. Please RSVP to 401-710-9784.